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Collection Description

A wide array of interviews that help document San Diego history from those who lived through it.

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Charlotte Hotchkiss Oral History, Part 1, 1972
Mrs. Hotchkiss is 40 at the time of this interview, and she says she developed a love for "the land" from her grandfather. She had a roadside stand on Highway 60 while she lived with her family. She majored in sociology at Pomona College and enjoyed her education. She then got a certificate in secondary education from San Diego State University and did some substitute teaching but gave it up to continue her volunteer work. A former clerk on the governing board of Escondido Union High, Escondido, California, she discusses the challenges she faced as a woman clerk as well as some school board decisions, including a call to control men's hair length. This interview was reformatted by the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP)., San Diego State University, Transfer comments from PBCore.xml file: High Background Noise on Tape; High Amount of Hiss on Tape; Static on Tape; brief warbling at the end of side A recorded on tape; speed fluctuations at the end of side B recorded on tape
Charlotte Hotchkiss Oral History, Part 2, 1972
Mrs. Hotchkiss talks about racial diversity in Escondido. (There is some sticking and distortion in the original tape.) As a former clerk on the governing board of Escondido Union High, Escondido, California, she discusses the challenges she faced as a woman clerk as well as some school board decisions, including a call to control men's hair length. This interview was reformatted by the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP)., San Diego State University, Transfer comments from PBCore.xml file: High Background Noise on Tape; High Amount of Hiss on Tape; Static on Tape; brief warbling at the end of side A recorded on tape; speed fluctuations at the end of side B recorded on tape
Charlotte Hotchkiss Oral History, Part 3, 1972
I never stop to think that I can't do it, Hotchkiss answers when asked why more women don't go into politics, to contrast with shy women and men as well, who don't think they can speak publicly. As former clerk on the governing board of Escondido Union High, Escondido, California, she discusses the challenges she faced in politics., San Diego State University, Transfer comments from PBCore.xml file: High Background Noise on Tape; High Amount of Hiss on Tape; Static on Tape; brief warbling at the end of side A recorded on tape; speed fluctuations at the end of side B recorded on tape
Dai Thi Hai Oral History
The interviewee discusses leaving Vietnam, staying in refugee camps and coming to San Diego and getting a business degree at San Diego State University. The interview is conducted in Vietnamese. This interview was reformatted by the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP)., San Diego State University, Transfer Comments from csds_000025_PBCore.xml: "Side B is Blank; High Amount of Hum on Tape; High Background Noise on Tape; General Poor Recording Quality; High Amount of Hiss on Tape"
Early San Diego Businesses, 1979
Very soon nothing will be left except a few buildings, but the dedication and risks involved in running these early businesses have been preserved with profiles on nine local businesspeople. Starting with George Despie, people spoke about their businesses over photographs of their business establishments and those who worked there. Despie had a music store; Franciska Croxall Bale was a building contractor; Gracia Mae Ogden ran a hobby shop. Sherman Pethley had a radio shop that transformed into Academy TV when television came in. Guy Carmichael ran an automobile gasoline station from about 1924 to 1968, in North Park. Armond Viora was a locksmith who also sold locks and ground keys in his store, bought after being an apprentice there. Margaret and Dave Fearnley opened Town Pump No. 1 (a soda fountain) on Adams Avenue, then took over a cafe and made a soda fountain and lunch counter out of it, along with a third location. Others involved in the production were Charles Brockmann, Jean Castro, Lucile Sheridan, and Jim Smith., San Diego State University, GPS coordinates are for Franciska Bale's first house
Francellene Biane Roper Oral History, Part 1, 1979
A "fifth-generation winemaker's daughter," Roper was born in Cucamonga as Francellene Biane. She is also a fifth-generation Californian. She talks about her family who operated Brookside Winery, the oldest winery in California, started in 1832. She was a beautician before she was married, and after she was divorced she went back to her family and got a job in one of the wineries. This interview was reformatted by the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP)., San Diego State University, Transfer Comments from csds_000018_PBCore.xml: High Amount of Hum on Tape; Static on Tape; High Background Noise on Tape
Francellene Biane Roper Oral History, Part 2, 1979
Roper says their wine business is the oldest continuously operating business in California and tells a story about Prohibition and Brookside Winery. She points out that "growing grapes is just like farming," and that it was one reason she didn't want to go into the wine business. This interview was reformatted by the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP)., San Diego State University, Transfer Comments from csds_000018_PBCore.xml: High Amount of Hum on Tape; Static on Tape; High Background Noise on Tape
Interview with A. Lyle Loomis, 1973
This is an oral history in the collection of the San Diego State University Special Collections and University Archives, digitized by the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP). Loomis discusses the Great Depression in San Diego as well as organizing local unions., San Diego State University, https://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=DS19760325.2.111
Interview with Alice Hoskins
The tape starts with a conversation in which Hoskins is saying there were no restrictions on females in her family, which was "Scotch-Irish," with the Byrd side of the family coming from England. She talks about seeing child labor in factories, an impression that stayed with her. She attended Meridian College for Women in Meridian, Mississippi, her hometown, although she was born in Brooklyn. (She was 95 when interviewed.) Hoskins was raised as a Methodist but became a Unitarian later. She was married in 1915 to a man in fire protection, and they came to San Diego, where he worked for San Diego Gas & Electric., San Diego State University, http://www.archives.com/1940-census/loretta-hoskins-ca-33179823 seen 10/24/2017
Interview with Beatrice Knief, 1992
Beatrice Knief attended San Diego State from 1935 to 1939. In this interview she talks about life during the Great Depression, women's places in schools, and her memories of campus life. She recalls working in New Deal programs and having to deal with prejudice since her parents were divorced, and also her discriminatory experiences with men. This interview includes a reading of a poem that Knief wrote about sexual harassment on the job. Baylor Brooks is mentioned in the interview., San Diego State University, https://library.sdsu.edu/scua/raising-our-voices/sdsu-history/1930s-alumni#Gorton for description, interviewer name, date but no transcript, seen 9/20/2017
Interview with Belle Baranceanu, 1980
Belle Baranceanu was born in Chicago, Illinois, July 17, 1902. She attended the Minneapolis School of Art, and in 1926 moved back to Chicago to study under influential painter Anthony Angarola at the Art Institute of Chicago. Baranceanu is best known for her large murals, which graced San Diego buildings such as the La Jolla Post Office, Roosevelt Junior High School, La Jolla High School, and the Balboa Park Club. These murals were commissioned by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) during the Great Depression. In this interview, Baranceanu discusses her family background, recollections of the San Diego art community in the 1940s-1960s, and her murals and teaching experience. Her interview was eight years before Baranceanu's death., San Diego State University, description etc. from https://library.sdsu.edu/scua/raising-our-voices/san-diego-history/art#Baranceanu
Interview with Carlos A. Fernandez, 1978
Fernandez, living at this time in Brawley, California, was a Mexican farmworker in the Imperial Valley of California. He was born on the 24th of September, 1901, in Rayón, Sonora, Mexico. His father was also born in Rayón, but he was not sure of his mother's birthplace and did not know his grandparents. He had one brother and five sisters. After sticking out the ravages of the Mexican Revolution, in 1918 he and two others joined railroad worker gangs ("renganches") brought to the United States, and his family relocated to the States in 1919, bringing a mule-drawn wagon to Tolleson, Arizona. In 1923, the family moved to Los Angeles and picked grapes every summer near Fresno. The following year they moved to the Imperial Valley, where they had heard there were jobs for women. Families who couldn't support themselves were deported to Mexico. Braceros (migrants brought in) were preferred by farm owners, making work for local people hard to get. Fernandez bought a bar vacated by Japanese people facing internment and began to grow his own crops. This oral history was done for Richard Griswold del Castillo's American Southwest History Class "in cooperation with Steve Colston of the San Diego History Research Center." It was digitized by the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP). The interview was conducted in Spanish but the transcript is available in Spanish and English. Names mentioned during the interview include: Pascual Orozco Vazquez and Coronel Sergio Enrique Jirón., San Diego State University, https://calisphere.org/item/f347f042ddbd02f87bdbd3bb970f4e92/ A note on this site: "In part 1 levels get very low after 00:05:30 as on original tape. In part 2 there are some sections that are unintelligible due to static on original tape."

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